Greek Gastronomy on Santorini

With its warm breezes, white-washed stone homes, flower gardens, vineyards, and a lagoon surrounded by a stony cliff, the Greek island of Santorini in the south Aegean Sea is a piece of heaven on earth. While it’s a part of the Cyclades group of islands, Santorini is a mythical island that has a magic all its own. Once known as Kalliste, or ‘the most beautiful one,’ Santorini today is named after Saint Irene. Despite its name change, it continues to be regaled for its beauty; Travel+Leisure magazine named it the number one island in all of Europe in 2011, in large part due to its natural beauty.

The island, also known as a caldera (volcano), dates back to the Minoan civilization. Once part of a larger island, a volcanic eruption during the Bronze Age — 3,500 years ago — split the island away from others in the Cyclades island chain. With the island’s volcanic soil, Santorini is particularly suited to a wonderful array of vegetables that are grown with very little water, including the island’s famous fava, white eggplants, large cucumbers, capers, and, especially, cherry tomatoes. Their ancient winemaking traditions are also important on Santorini; most vintages are made with Assyrtiko grapes, and locals are particularly proud of their sweet Vinsanto wine.

Greek Gastronomy on Santorini

With its warm breezes, white-washed stone homes, flower gardens, vineyards, and a lagoon surrounded by a stony cliff, the Greek island of Santorini in the south Aegean Sea is a piece of heaven on earth. While it’s a part of the Cyclades group of islands, Santorini is a mythical island that has a magic all its own. Once known as Kalliste, or ‘the most beautiful one,’ Santorini today is named after Saint Irene. Despite its name change, it continues to be regaled for its beauty; Travel+Leisure magazine named it the number one island in all of Europe in 2011, in large part due to its natural beauty.

The island, also known as a caldera (volcano), dates back to the Minoan civilization. Once part of a larger island, a volcanic eruption during the Bronze Age — 3,500 years ago — split the island away from others in the Cyclades island chain. With the island’s volcanic soil, Santorini is particularly suited to a wonderful array of vegetables that are grown with very little water, including the island’s famous fava, white eggplants, large cucumbers, capers, and, especially, cherry tomatoes. Their ancient winemaking traditions are also important on Santorini; most vintages are made with Assyrtiko grapes, and locals are particularly proud of their sweet Vinsanto wine.


Latest Review

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The cooking lesson at Aromis Aliv was the best. The food was normal and easy to replicate. The one at Selene Restaurant was not as good and lasted too long. I can never imagine a situation where I would want to make my own Phyllo dough. It was interesting, but we spent at least an hour watching how to make Phyllo dough from scratch. The island tour was good, but we didn't have accurate information about it beforehand. We had no idea that it would last all day and include a two hour stop over at the beach. Winery tour was very interesting. it was a definite highlight of the tour. Definitely recommend future travelers to check out the location beforehand. It was a great trip. Hope to take another International Kitchen vacation in the future. [Regarding The International Kitchen staff:] They were great! Lynda P., IN _Response from The International Kitchen:_ We're glad to hear what an overall wonderful time you had! We appreciate your feedback and have passed it on to our partners in Santorini as well.

Trip Details

Most weeks your 2 cooking classes are led by Chef Vassilis who grew up on the island with a large family, and who today runs a popular local restaurant which is known for its delectable appetizers and use of local products. When he’s not in his kitchen or spending evening soirees with friends singing, drinking, and eating, he’s representing the island in international cooking competitions.
When Chef Vassilis is not available, one of his collaborators, or another local chef, will teach you about the traditions and techniques of Greek Island cooking. While many recipes are seafood based, ingredients — such as the island’s famous tomatoes — are sourced from the local market.


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